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SATs 2019

Key Stage 2 SATS 2019

KS2 SATs were overhauled to be in line with the new national curriculum in May 2016. If your child will be sitting Y6 SATs in 2018, read on for the most up-to-date information for parents.

In the summer term of 2016, children in Year 2 and Year 6 were the first to take the new SATs papers. The new-style SATs for English and maths reflect the new national curriculum, and are more rigorous than previous years' tests. There is also a completely new SATs marking scheme and grading system which has replaced national curriculum levels.

At the end of Year 6, children sit tests in:

  • Reading
  • Maths
  • Spelling, punctuation and grammar

These tests are both set and marked externally, and the results are used to measure the school’s performance (for example, through reporting to Ofsted and published league tables). Your child’s marks will be used in conjunction with teacher assessment to give a broader picture of their attainment.Key Stage 2 Reading
READING
The reading test is a single paper with questions based on three passages of text. Your child will have one hour, including reading time, to complete the test.
There will be a selection of question types, including:

  • Ranking/ordering, e.g. ‘Number the events below to show the order in which they happen in the story’
  • Labelling, e.g. ‘Label the text to show the title of the story’
  • Find and copy, e.g. ‘Find and copy one word that suggests what the weather is like in the story’
  • Short constructed response, e.g. ‘What does the bear eat?’
  • Open-ended response, e.g. ‘Look at the sentence that begins Once upon a time. How does the writer increase the tension throughout this paragraph? Explain fully, referring to the text in your answer.’

From 2018 the Department for Education has announced that the reading content of the KS2 SATs will be more closely linked to the curriculum to ensure children are drawing on their knowledge when answering reading comprehension questions.
 

GRAMMAR, PUNCTUATION and SPELLING
The grammar, punctuation and spelling test consists of two parts: a grammar and punctuation paper requiring short answers, lasting 45 minutes, and an aural spelling test of 20 words, lasting around 15 minutes.

The grammar and punctuation test will include two sub-types of questions:

  • Selected response, e.g. ‘Identify the adjectives in the sentence below’
  • Constructed response, e.g. ‘Correct/complete/rewrite the sentence below,’ or, ‘The sentence below has an apostrophe missing. Explai

Children sit three papers in maths:

  • Paper 1: arithmetic, 30 minutes
  • Papers 2 and 3: reasoning, 40 minutes per paper

Paper 1 will consist of fixed response questions, where children have to give the correct answer to calculations, including long multiplication and division. Papers 2 and 3 will involve a number of question types, including:

  • Multiple choice
  • True or false
  • Constrained questions, e.g. giving the answer to a calculation, drawing a shape or completing a table or chart
  • Less constrained questions, where children will have to explain their approach for solving a problem

Key Stage 2 science

Not all children in Year 6 will take science SATs. However, a number of schools will be required to take part in science sampling: a test administered to a selected sample of children thought to be representative of the population as a whole. Science sampling testing will take place in the weeks commencing Monday 4 June 2018 and Monday 11 June 2018.

For those who are selected, there will be three papers:

  • Biology: 25 minutes, 22 marks
  • Chemistry: 25 minutes, 22 marks
  • Physics: 25 minutes, 22 marks

 

It sounds very intimidating, but these are ‘questions in a physics/chemistry/biology context’, for example:

Biology: ‘Describe the differences in the life cycle of an amphibian and a mammal’

Chemistry: ‘Group a list of materials according to whether they are solid, liquid or gas’

Physics: ‘Predict whether two magnets will attract or repel each other, based on where the poles are facing’

The Year 6 KS2 SATs will be administered in the week commencing 14 May 2018. The timetable will be:
Monday 13 May 2019
English grammar, punctuation and spelling Paper 1: questions
English grammar, punctuation and spelling Paper 2: spelling

Tuesday 14 May 2019
English reading
Wednesday 15 May 2019
Mathematics Paper 1: arithmetic
Mathematics Paper 2: reasoning

Thursday 176May 2019
Mathematics Paper 3: reasoning

RESULTS
The previous national curriculum levels have been scrapped, and instead children are given scaled scores (read our parents' guide to primary school grading and SATs codes for more details).

You will be given your child’s scaled score and whether they have reached the expected standard set by the Department for Education (‘NS’ means that the expected standard was not achieved and ‘AS’ means the expected standard was achieved). 

The range of scaled scores available for each KS2 test is:

  • 80 (the lowest scaled score that can be awarded)
  • 120 (the highest scaled score)

The expected standard for each test is a scaled score of 100 or more. If a child is awarded a scaled score of 99 or less they won't have achieved the expected standard in the test.

The Department for Education expects at least 65 per cent of children to reach the expected standard (the figure was initially 85 per cent but has been revised)

 

Primary School Grading System Explained for Parents

www.theschoolrun.com

 

In September 2014 national curriculum levels in English schools were replaced by a new grading system. We explain what parents need to know about the new assessment levels as well as new KS1 and KS2 SATs from 2016 and the new Reception baseline assessment test.

Why is it that just as you’re finally getting to grips with the education system, everything changes – yet again? With a new curriculum in force in English primary schools from September 2014, how your children’s progress is measured has changed too.

Why the new Primary grading system?
Until September 2014, children’s progress was assessed using national curriculum levels. The government has now removed ‘level descriptors’ from the National Curriculum and schools are expected to establish their own assessment systems to suit their children and parents.

Why the change?
The Department for Education felt levels were too vague and complicated for parents and not very good at helping them understand their child’s progress; there were also concerns that the levels system could contribute to children developing a "fixed mindset" about their ability and potential for growth. Until September 2014, grades were used in school to grade pupils from ages five to 14. At the age of 11, when children left primary school, they were expected to have achieved at least a Level 4 in English, maths and science.
grade in the no-levels system?

So how are children awarded a grade in the no levels system?
It is difficult to give a definitive answer to this question since it is up to individual schools to decide how they assess pupils’ progress.

It is likely that in most schools teachers will use statements such as these to describe pupils' progress, as well as commenting on whether your child has made good progress over the year, giving details of curriculum areas where they have achieved well and areas that need more development and support:

  • Working within the expected level of attainment for his/her age
  • Working towards the expected level of attainment
  • Working below the expected level of attainment
  • Working beyond the expected level of attainm

 

 

SATS results explained
Since summer 2016, more challenging SATs tests have reflected the new curriculum at the end of the Key Stages. Children now receive a scaled score instead of a level. Their raw score – the actual number of marks they accrue – will be translated into a scaled score; this helps to allow for differences in the difficulty of the tests from year to year so that pupils' results can be compared accurately.

For KS1 SATs a score of 100 means the child is working at the expected standard, a score below 100 indicates that the child needs more support and a score of above 100 suggests the child is working at a higher level than expected for their age. The maximum score possible is 115, and the minimum is 85. You will be told whether your child has reached the national standard in their KS1 SATs as part of their end-of-KS1 report, but won't be given their test scores unless you ask for them. 

Children are also be matched against ‘performance descriptors’ (in other words what pupils are expected to know and be able to do at the time of testing) when being assessed by their teachers in non-SATs subjects at the end of Key Stage 1 and 2 to see if they’ve achieved the expected standard.

In KS2, the papers are marked externally, with no teacher assessment involved. Each child receives a raw score (though you probably won't be given it as a parent), a scaled score, and confirmation of whether or not they achieved the national standard (‘NS’  means the expected standard was not achieved; ‘AS’ means the expected standard was achieved).

The range of scaled scores available for each KS2 test ranges from 80, the lowest possible scaled score, to 120, the highest possible scaled score.

A scaled score of 100 or more means that the child has met the expected standard in each KS2 SATs test; a scaled score of 99 or less means they haven't reached the government-expected standard.

 

Teacher Assessments KS2
As well as receiving KS2 SATs results, at the end of Year 6 you will be told your child's teacher-assessment results for reading, writing, mathematics and science. The teacher-assessment result codes you can expect to see are:

  • GDS: Working at greater depth within the expected standard (for writing assessment only)
  • EXS: Working at the expected standard
  • WTS: Working towards the expected standard (for writing assessment only)
  • HNM: Has not met the expected standard (reading and maths assessment only)
  • PKG: Pre-key stage, growing development of the expected standard (the child is working at a lower level than expected)
  • PKF: Pre-key stage, foundations for the expected standard (the child is working at a significantly lower level than expected)
  • BLW: The child is working below the pre-key stage standards (the lowest level of attainment)
  • A: Awarded if the child was absent
  • D: Awarded if the child is disapplied (has not been been tested at KS2 level)

 

When will your child be assessed?

Alongside continuous teacher assessments, there will still be national assessments at regular intervals in English primary education:

 

 

What are the expected grades for the end of each year group?

Under the changes, from 2016 the government has expected 85% of pupils to reach a ‘good level of attainment’ in updated Key Stage 2 SATs (as opposed to the current 65% – a massive increase).

With levels abolished and the introduction of ‘performance descriptors’, it looks like there will be a lot less emphasis on expected grades for each year group, but rather a focus on whether a child has acquired the expected knowledge or not; the Department for Education will set the precise extent of progress required in each year group.

 

What about the children who are above and below the expected level?

Of course, there will still be children who will not meet the expected standard and they will continue to be teacher assessed using pre-key stage standards (a way of measuring the progress of children who are working below the national curriculum levels; the standards replace P-scales). By assessing children more formally at Reception level (with the new Reception baseline assessment test), the government hopes the children requiring more teacher input will be identified earlier.

In the past, the brightest Year 6 children could be entered for advanced SATs papers called Level 6 papers for English and maths. These tests are no longer be offered; instead, all children take the same tests, but the papers include a number of more difficult questions that are intended to stretch higher achieving children

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